Trade TT Returns

Not Jack B

Western Thunderer
I may be rather cynical but haven’t the gremlins of the Peco empire been flogging TT3 track labelled as HOm for a number of years? I know that Sydney P vowed never to support the burgeoning TT market after Triang abandoned it but Peco’s subtle volte face was to rebrand their 12mm for the lucrative Euro Johnnies.

Tim the Cynic
 

Firehead

Member
I think it's more the other way round, Peco have have been selling H0m track (designed for the European market), which some of us have been using for TT3.

This new launch is not 1:100 (Triang) scale, it's 1:120 scale, i.e. proper TT scale that the rest of world uses.
 

Yorkshire Dave

Western Thunderer
Thought it was April 1st :D. Had to pinch myself to make sure it wasn't........

A UK model railway company making RTR products without compromises and be compatible in scale and gauge to the rest of the world (1:120).

I hope this will be successful venture for Peco as there is a big market on mainland Europe where 1:120 TT is more prevelant as noted earlier.
 

Simon

Flying Squad
Well done Peco, an imaginative project, which plays to their strengths, which will lead to more exports, and which will be manufactured in the UK by a workforce with decent wages and conditions.

Just a shame that so much of the UK's "business community" don't appear remotely interested in doing anything similarly decent or straightforward.

Apologies for wandering away from model railways, I'm off to paint a rose arch!

Simon
 

LarryG

Western Thunderer
I see TT as an ideal solution for those strapped for space and yet it is big enough to actually model and see the the detail. Even when I had normal good eyesight, N gauge was too twee for my liking.

Thinking in terms of a minimal layout on a plank and knowing Peco are producing GWR prototypes, then a Collett 0-4-2T, auto coach and Toad would make a fine start. Hopefully, some wagons kits would follow.
 

Joe's Garage

Western Thunderer
Looks like some very nice models in the pipeline according to Hattons' website including a laser cut model of West Bay station.......hmmmmmmmm!
Peco has always supported our hobby with a wide range of very high quality products, and as Simon says it is good that a lot is UK made.
May it be a successful venture.
 

John Ross

Western Thunderer
Since the buffer stop in the new range looks very much like the one in their original 1960s offering with a bit of luck these original wagon masters may still lurk in the back of a Peco warehouse awaiting rediscovery. I started serious railway modelling at the start of the 1970s so even though these wagons only cost 40p including purchase tax I declined to buy. Perhaps if the container kit is reintroduced, previously 7p including purchase tax I could be tempted. I think the real decider would be a locomotive and perhaps if they offered a 08 with its wide use on the UK network a resurgence in TT could be in the offing.

Good luck with this range.

John.
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76043

Western Thunderer
Having no knowledge of TT 120 until this thread popped up, are all the old PECO and GEM kits the right scale? Are they 1:100? (Where's the 'I don't know' emoji when you need it??)
Tony
 

Yorkshire Dave

Western Thunderer
Having no knowledge of TT 120 until this thread popped up, are all the old PECO and GEM kits the right scale?

As noted earlier TT 1:120 is the correct scale at 2.54 mm to the foot for the 12mm track gauge which is/was popular in Europe under the old DDR Berliner TT Bahn label and now Tillig.

As is the English way Tri-ang TT was a compromise at 3mm to the foot (1:100) giving rise to trains on 4' track gauge - deja vu :rolleyes:. Therefore any kits would have been produced at 1:100 and not 1:120.
 

76043

Western Thunderer
As noted earlier TT 1:120 is the correct scale at 2.54 mm to the foot for the 12mm track gauge which is/was popular in Europe under the old DDR Berliner TT Bahn label and now Tillig.

As is the English way Tri-ang TT was a compromise at 3mm to the foot (1:100) giving rise to trains on 4' track gauge - deja vu :rolleyes:. Therefore any kits would have been produced at 1:100 and not 1:120.
Thank you, I had thought the old British TT was 3mm scale.
Tony
 

76043

Western Thunderer
Personally, I'd say that I have to work out what 1/10th of an inch looks like by going to my nearest ruler. I can visualise 2.54mm perfectly. I don't wish to light the Imperial v metric debate that HM Gov has recently started, but I'm in my fifties and wasn't taught imperial at school, so am metric in everything but pints. They didn't teach me pints at school, I learnt that later. My weight and height is only known to me in kilos and cm. My Dublingham layout was built in metric, I converted the measurements to imperial for exhibition organisers and was very happy to do so.

I'm happy with the 'X'mm to the foot business we have too.

No doubt I have lit the touchpaper with the above, but this is my lived experience.

Tony
 

oldravendale

Western Thunderer
It is, indeed, a matter of age, Tony. I function "adequately" in the metric environment but was taught imperial measurements at school. Even now I often have to convert a metric measurement to imperial to get a sense of scale. For example, a metre is a couple of inches over a yard.

Having said this I think that now we are all at least accustomed to metric measurements and know either how to convert or know where to go to find out we should stay with them.

I'm not sure where I'd go, though, to find the value of a groat, though.

Brian
 
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