Weathered Locos & Stock

LarryG

Western Thunderer
One of my favourite touches is the relatively clean boiler barrel ring nearest the smoke box, and then the other part of the boiler has been left untouched and grimy - including the safety valve cover. I guess the cleaner(s) at the time felt it too much effort to reach, although they did manage to wipe the side of the firebox!
This is pretty well how things were with BR cleaners (I was one). We used a ladder with tank locos and so the firebox sides were within easy reach to clean. There were hot things on many fireboxes (safety valves on non-GWR locos) and we avoided such areas. Reaching over the top of the things mounted on the tank tops to reach the sloping boiler was dodgy becasue one could burn oneself on the safety valve or top feed pipes. Cleaning the front ring of the boiler was done by clambering up onto the running plate so we cleaned as far as we could reach.

Paint near the cab doorway was usually damaged by footwear, but the lower area was often grotty from use of the slacker pipe while washing down the cab floor and coal dust from the coaling plant which seemed to eat into paintwork if left for any length of time. Cleaning the back of the coal bunker was often a waste of time because the paint was too damaged from track dust and what-not. Smokeboxes were painted with a different (heat-resistant) paint and could not be cleaned after even a short time in traffic. Same with running plate. If in doubt, imagine what you would do :p:p
 

Deano747

Western Thunderer
This is pretty well how things were with BR cleaners (I was one). We used a ladder with tank locos and so the firebox sides were within easy reach to clean. There were hot things on many fireboxes (safety valves on non-GWR locos) and we avoided such areas. Reaching over the top of the things mounted on the tank tops to reach the sloping boiler was dodgy becasue one could burn oneself on the safety valve or top feed pipes. Cleaning the front ring of the boiler was done by clambering up onto the running plate so we cleaned as far as we could reach.

Paint near the cab doorway was usually damaged by footwear, but the lower area was often grotty from use of the slacker pipe while washing down the cab floor and coal dust from the coaling plant which seemed to eat into paintwork if left for any length of time. Cleaning the back of the coal bunker was often a waste of time because the paint was too damaged from track dust and what-not. Smokeboxes were painted with a different (heat-resistant) paint and could not be cleaned after even a short time in traffic. Same with running plate. If in doubt, imagine what you would do :p:p
Thanks, Larry. Some very interesting points from experience!
Everyone has their own approach to weathering. I try and look at photos of the original and try and interpret what I see.

Regards, Rob.
 

Focalplane

Western Thunderer
I feel quite inadequate when it comes to weathering skills. I admire others’ work and know that my experience is not up to par. And this is my problem, as a geologist I can cringe at some representations of cuttings and outcrops associated with layouts. There are some superb examples on WT, think of Stephen Fay’s dioramas along the Dawlish Teignmouth line. One of my favourites before I left RMWeb a few years ago was Tony Wright’s shallow cuttings at Little Bytham. Hardly cuttings but just a few strata of off white limestone that looked just right trackside. And perfectly represented!

With the ability to be critical about lineside geology I have managed to avoid getting into weathering though I know I am going to have to dive in the deep end one of these days. Wagons and vans are my only real attempts so far.

Larry’s comments above are so logical it amazes me. Why didn’t I think of hot areas being passed over, or damage from falling coal on an otherwise nicely cleaned top link Jubilee? Well, I learned a few things today!
 

Dog Star

Western Thunderer
All of the appreciation that Wt-ers have shown is truly justified; particularly, in my opinion, the GWR Clerestory in Lake 1912 livery.

What have you done in respect of BR diesels? Westerns and 37s for example.
 
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